Class Tech Tips

I use Gmail for my personal email account and it is great in the classroom too. I have students send work they completed on their iPads (this works with PCs too) to a teacher Gmail account I set up in September.  Each student uses the same student Gmail account to send their work to me (I’ve set up each student’s iPad to send and receive emails from the same account).

So that’s two gmail accounts: 1. My teacher gmail account, 2. One student email address that all of the students use to send their work

If students write their name in the subject line of the email it makes it easy to search through my old emails for all of the work they have sent me that year.  Using Gmail’s search function, I can type in a student’s name and it pulls up all of the work that child has…

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Scenes From The Battleground

My most popular blogpost ever (in terms of hits) wasn’t really written by me. Entitled “What OFSTED say they want” it was a transcript of a speech made by the chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw.

It became widely distributed because it seemed to contradict the widespread impression that OFSTED wanted “progressive” style teaching, with lots of groupwork, entertainment, discovery learning and little teacher talk. Sir Michael rejected many of the common ideas about OFSTED, even saying he was wary of “an insistence that there should be a balance between teacher led activities and independent learning” and describing a “very traditional teacher” who “ taught in a pretty didactic way” as outstanding.

In a later speech – one that I actually saw him deliver – he made similar comments and in some ways went further, suggesting that even a “fairly boring lesson” could be acceptable if there was learning.

Let me emphasise…

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Ashby food

It is often said that science and practical skills are two separate entities within food as a taught subject. The curriculum tends to fall easily into the theory of how science works in food, and then the practical (considered less academic) capability of producing food and designs.

In reality the two work very closely together. Some of the most modern, inventive and unique dish and menu designs in the world today rely on science in food to manipulate and create new structures. Food design is ever changing and evolving. Some of the most successful restaurants in the world use food science as a basis for their menu development. We only have to look at The Fat Duck and El Bulli for inspiration and with modern molecular gastronomy techniques including textures and sous vide. Food design has become cutting edge and exciting. Food Technology, design and science are therefore not just…

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1st proper blog…@DTtoolkit


After years of deliberation and experimentation, I’ve decided to start an @DTtoolkit teaching blog. I just want to see what happens.

I have taken inspiration from @TeacherToolkit. If I have even half the success of him I will be a very happy DT teacher.

You can also follow me on twitter @DTtoolkit

To find out more about click on the about page above.